CCC’s Energy and Environment Working Group At Bat

CCC’s Energy and Environment Working Group At Bat

The Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission’s efforts to refine its regulations for energy and environmental performance for cultivation and product manufacturing facilities are now officially underway. Last week, the Commission convened the first meeting of its long-awaited Energy and Environment Working Group (EEWG). Membership in the group is so far limited to the bare minimum required by the law: designees from the Department of Energy Resources, Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Agricultural Resources. A CCC representative sits on the EEWG but does not have a vote. The meeting itself was perfunctory, essentially a pre-game show to the main event. But it did reveal that the EEWG intends to inform itself to some degree through a series of listening sessions across the state. The Group proposed to itself a series of public listening sessions across the state later this summer with the stated objective of hearing from a range of stakeholders, including growers, ancillary service providers, other businesses and industries, and...
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Five things you need to know about the Massachusetts cannabis energy rules

Five things you need to know about the Massachusetts cannabis energy rules

Are you concerned about what Massachusetts’s energy and environmental regulations may mean for your young cannabis cultivation, extraction or dispensary business? My advice: inform yourself, do your homework, and don’t pack your bags. Before you walk away in frustration, here are five things you should know about the current rules: 1. Yes, most of the regulations apply to ALL marijuana businesses planning to operate in Massachusetts. In section 500.105: General Operational Requirements for Marijuana Establishments (1) (p), the state calls for every marijuana business applicant - including cultivators, manufacturers, labs, retails, transporters, and researchers - to demonstrate consideration of energy efficiency, renewable energy and utility rebate programs. The state has not yet offered specific guidance on what might constitute an appropriate level of consideration in an application, but an effective response will show that you have thought about how you may: Integrate renewable energy into your power acquisition plan (and if not, why not), Deploy technologies or approaches to optimize your facility's...
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CCC raises the bar on indoor cannabis cultivation

CCC raises the bar on indoor cannabis cultivation

At yesterday’s public meeting at the Massachusetts State House, the Cannabis Control Commission (CCC) agreed to include the recommendations of the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. If these recommendations are included in the CCC’s final regulations filed by March 15 of this year, Massachusetts will be light-years ahead of any other state in regulating the energy and environmental impact of legal cannabis cultivation and product manufacturing. Several of the proposed regulations are groundbreaking in their own right, and in sum they are a BFD (to paraphrase Joe Biden). But what are they? What are their implications for the cannabis industry? Should advocates for a greener cannabis industry have buyer’s remorse? A lighting power density (LPD) standard of no more than 36 W per square foot of canopy for a cultivation facility with over 5,000 ft² of canopy.  [UPDATE: The final regulations offer an olive branch to growers, giving them the flexibility to meet the LPD standard as an...
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Why I Formed Climate Resources Group

I got my first taste of the urgency of climate change while spending a summer as an unpaid intern at an energy and environmental NGO in Dakar, Senegal. I was fresh out of a two year-long post-college experience in Washington, DC, and I wanted to get back to West Africa, were I had spent a year abroad in college. At ENDA-TM, I read for the first time the UNFCCC reports on climate change and desertification. Later during my stint working in rural Senegal on a fuel switching program to encourage villagers to purchase kerosene stoves instead of harvesting and burning shrubs, for the first time I began to appreciate the human dimensions of climate change, which for this part of the world largely meant more heat, less rain, less forest, more desert. A spark went off within me. I took my newfound passion for finding more environmentally sustainable ways to meet our basic (and not so basic) energy needs to New England, where...
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