Energy and Environment Working Group comments

Climate Resources Group was a proud signatory to the comments below to the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission Energy and Environment Working Group today. *** Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission 101 Federal Street, 13th floor Boston, MA 02110 Submitted via email: CannabisCommission@State.MA.US September 14, 2018 Dear Cannabis Control Commission, Thank you for the opportunity to provide comment to the Energy and Environment Working Group (EEWG). On September 11, 2018, Resource Innovation Institute, in partnership with Climate Resources Group, convened a Cannabis Energy Roundtable with stakeholders in the cannabis industry and those who provide services to them. This work is funded by a Massachusetts-based foundation, E4TheFuture. The discussion among cannabis operators, construction professionals, technology manufacturers, utilities and energy policy experts yielded mutually agreeable issues of interest for the EEWG’s consideration, described below. Over the course of the coming weeks, we anticipate recommending specific language on the following topics: Clarity to current statutory language There is confusion in the marketplace about how the terms “Growing space,” “Mature” and “Active” are used in the...
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Five things you need to know about the Massachusetts cannabis energy rules

Five things you need to know about the Massachusetts cannabis energy rules

Are you concerned about what Massachusetts’s energy and environmental regulations may mean for your young cannabis cultivation, extraction or dispensary business? My advice: inform yourself, do your homework, and don’t pack your bags. Before you walk away in frustration, here are five things you should know about the current rules: 1. Yes, most of the regulations apply to ALL marijuana businesses planning to operate in Massachusetts. In section 500.105: General Operational Requirements for Marijuana Establishments (1) (p), the state calls for every marijuana business applicant - including cultivators, manufacturers, labs, retails, transporters, and researchers - to demonstrate consideration of energy efficiency, renewable energy and utility rebate programs. The state has not yet offered specific guidance on what might constitute an appropriate level of consideration in an application, but an effective response will show that you have thought about how you may: Integrate renewable energy into your power acquisition plan (and if not, why not), Deploy technologies or approaches to optimize your facility's...
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The Politics of Sustainability

The Politics of Sustainability

Cannabis Business Times recently featured an article I wrote, titled "The Politics of Sustainability: How to work proactively with city and state energy and environmental officials to keep you clear of citations, and make your grow more sustainable." Below is the lede, and you can find the whole article here: When it comes to energy and the environment, there is bad news and good news for cannabis growers. The bad news is the Trump Administration has abdicated much of its responsibility to protect the environment, and the cannabis industry—particularly energy- and water-intensive commercial-scale growing and processing facilities—will be squarely in the crosshairs of state energy and environmental regulators as a result. The good news, however, is that this presents three prime opportunities for cultivators: To come together to work with policymakers to craft regulations that make sense for the industry and the environment, To explore innovative ways to reduce the energy and environmental impact of cannabis production, and To brand the cannabis...
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